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Monthly Archives: November 2016

How to Survive Post-Truth Era

How To Recognize A Fake News Story

If you’ve been looking at Facebook lately, you may have seen that Pope Francis endorsed Donald Trump, a town in Texas was quarantined due to a deadly disease and Germany just approved child marriage. To be clear, none of these events really happened ― but that didn’t stop news of them from spreading like a virus.

Fake news articles ― especially throughout this election year ― have increasingly become a fixture on social media. These posts, designed to deceive, run rampant across the internet. Only later, if ever, do readers discover that the stories they shared may have been false.

The publication of blatantly inaccurate stories is certainly not new to the digital age, or even the analog era ― just check your local supermarket aisle for tabloids ― but what is new is how easy it is for a reader to scan a headline on Facebook, hit share and watch his 500 followers do the same.

In the final three months before the election, 20 top-performing fake news stories on Facebook outperformed 20 top-performing factual stories from 19 major media outlets in terms of engagement, according to a BuzzFeed study published last week.

For more, check out HuffingtonPost.

Why I am Driving

I came across an old blog that I made on driving. Just this morning, I shared to my PHILOPE students how learning to drive was very empowering for me. Here are some of my thoughts on why I drive:)

Empowered Driver

One of the many misconceptions about Philippine driving is that it is dangerous and as such best taken by men.  Having been brought up as a girl with very limited means,  there was a lot I was fearful of, but poverty would force anyone to be resourceful, and so early on I had learned to deal with my fears. I would have to learn, stat, to carve opportunities for myself so i could survive.

But courage is built over time.  Confidence-building on my part took a lot of time because at the back of mind I would always feel like an impostor, or I would feel like  I would never be good enough in anything that required exceptional talent.

I am not a genius or some kind of a kid wonder but I know hard work and I never felt I had a sense of entitlement just because.  On the…

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Excellent Reflection on the Film, Insiang

Great job, Joshua Javier!

Different Women, Same Realization: Two Tales of Feminist Awakening

insiang

I shall divide this post into four parts: in the first part, I shall discuss how the article entitled “I Am Angry Because You Are Unjust: A Filipino Woman’s Awakening to Feminism” can help us to fully understand Insiang’s conduct not only before being raped by Dado, but also after the outrageous incident. In the second part, I shall state the definition of cultural double-bind based on the said article and reveal how Filipino women seem to be liberated at first glance but actually the exact opposite on a deeper level. In the third part, I shall enumerate and discuss the ways written in the article on how women can cope with pain and oppression and construct Insiang’s potential future though the lens of these ways. Finally, in the fourth part, I shall discuss how feminism has been beneficial not only for Filipinas, but also for the Filipino people in general.

Check out Joshua Javier’s blog here.

Big Lecture Series Tomorrow, November 11, 2016

Get your tickets now at the 4th Floor Faculty Center across Philosophy Department.  You can also avail of the tickets tomorrow morning at the ground floor, Yuchengco Building starting 7 AM.

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Excellent Reflection on Avatar

I’m Ready for Abduction – Avatar

Avatarjakeneytiri.jpg

From the list of eight (8) questions, these two (2) will be the focus of my popular (pop) culture analysis: 1) One interesting paradox in the film is the way in which the alien Na’vi people actually display far more human tendencies than the humans in the story. They appear more highly evolved than the humans in their respect of the life and the energy surrounding them. How do you see evidence of this throughout the film? 2) How would you describe the key roles that women play in the film? What portrayals struck you?

The premise behind these choices are primarily due to my interests in the society’s abstraction of “femininity”, which has recurrently been stressed out from my past blog posts, primarily in my discourse analysis using a feminist approach. The former question, on one hand, seems to manifest and fulfill a sense of “relevance” and “propriety” for this course, Philosophy of the Person.

For more, check out Georgia Fernandez of PHILOPE A54 blog here.

PHILOPE A54 Students with missing WordPress Journals and/or entries

  1. COLIGADO, JOYCE MIKAELA
  2. CONTRERAS, JEFFERSON ROSS
  3. GINES, KHEEM REYES
  4. RATERTA, FRANCIS KENNETH PEREZ
  5. TRANGIA, RAVEN CABALES
  6. UY, JIANNE NICOLE SEE
  7. YBAÑEZ, JHOGUEV PASILAN

 

Class Activities for November 7, 2016

Dear PHILOPE and GENDER students,

I apologize for the short notice, I will be attending a CHED Technical Panel Meeting today at 1 PM at the CHED Office in up Diliman.  Regular film showing will continue for PHILOPE class today while GENDERS class will make up for this on a later date.

Please be guided accordingly.

Bravo to Harvard University for calling out Sexism

Harvard University recently cancelled the  2016 season of its top-seeded Men’s Soccer Team after a report came out that in 2012, members of the soccer team made “disgusting” recruiting report wherein they rated potential members of the women’s soccer team based on their looks and perceived sexual capabilities.

Read the powerful response of the women who were subjected to this sexist and deplorable act.  Here is an excerpt of the letter:

“In all, we do not pity ourselves, nor do we ache most because of the personal nature of this attack. More than anything, we are frustrated that this is a reality that all women have faced in the past and will continue to face throughout their lives. We feel hopeless because men who are supposed to be our brothers degrade us like this. We are appalled that female athletes who are told to feel empowered and proud of their abilities are so regularly reduced to a physical appearance. We are distraught that mothers having daughters almost a half century after getting equal rights have to worry about men’s entitlement to bodies that aren’t theirs. We are concerned for the future, because we know that the only way we can truly move past this culture is for the very men who perpetrate it to stop it in its tracks.”

Stronger Together

On Monday, October 24, The Crimson published a story detailing a “scouting report” written by members of the 2012 men’s soccer team regarding incoming female recruits on the women’s soccer team.

We are these women, we are not anonymous, and rather than having our comments taken, spun, and published behind the guise of a fake anonymity offered to us by numerous news outlets, we have decided to speak for ourselves.

When first notified of this “scouting report” each of us responded with surprise and confusion, but ultimately brushed off the news as if it didn’t really matter. As if we weren’t surprised men had spoken of us inappropriately. As if this kind of thing was just, “normal.”

The sad reality is that we have come to expect this kind of behavior from so many men, that it is so “normal” to us we often decide it is not worth our time or effort to dwell on. Yet as the media has taken advantage of the Harvard name once more, it has become increasingly difficult to evade the pervasiveness of this story, harder still to elude the abhorrent judgment of our peers and the outrageous Internet commentary of the public, and hardest to subdue the embarrassment, disgust, and pain we feel as a result.

In all, we do not pity ourselves, nor do we ache most because of the personal nature of this attack. More than anything, we are frustrated that this is a reality that all women have faced in the past and will continue to face throughout their lives. We feel hopeless because men who are supposed to be our brothers degrade us like this. We are appalled that female athletes who are told to feel empowered and proud of their abilities are so regularly reduced to a physical appearance. We are distraught that mothers having daughters almost a half century after getting equal rights have to worry about men’s entitlement to bodies that aren’t theirs. We are concerned for the future, because we know that the only way we can truly move past this culture is for the very men who perpetrate it to stop it in its tracks.

Having considered members of this team our close friends for the past four years, we are beyond hurt to realize these individuals could encourage, silently observe, or participate in this kind of behavior, and for more than four years have neglected to apologize until this week.

We have seen the “scouting report” in its entirety. We know the fullest extent of its contents: the descriptions of our bodies, the numbers we were each assigned, and the comparison to each other and recruits in classes before us. This document attempts to pit us against one another, as if the judgment of a few men is sufficient to determine our worth. But, men, we know better than that. Eighteen years of soccer taught us that. Eighteen years—as successful, powerful, and undeniably brilliant female athletes – taught us that.

We know what it’s like to get knocked down. To lose a few battles. To sweat, to cry, to bleed. To fight so hard, yet no matter what we do, the game is still out of our hands. And, even still, we keep fighting; for ourselves, yes, but above all for our teammates. This document might have stung any other group of women you chose to target, but not us. We know as teammates that we rise to the occasion, that we are stronger together, and that we will not tolerate anything less than respect for women that we care for more than ourselves.

While at Harvard, our coaches taught us that the only thing we can control in life is ourselves—our own attitude and effort—ultimately, our own actions and our own words. The actions and words displayed by members of the 2012 men’s soccer team have deeply hurt us. They were careless, disgusting, and appalling, but an aberrant display of misogyny such as this does not reflect the type of environment Harvard Athletics cultivates. Harvard Athletics, specifically Harvard Women’s Soccer, succeeds because despite any atmosphere of competition, we know how to be a team—to lift each other up and bring out the best in those around us to achieve our goals. With these recent events, we have seen this firsthand through our support for and empathy of one another above ourselves.

“Locker room talk” is not an excuse because this is not limited to athletic teams. The whole world is the locker room. Yet in it we feel blessed to know many men who do not and would never participate in this behavior out of respect for us—out of respect for women. To them we are grateful, and with them we strive to share a mutual respect through our own actions and words.

As women of Harvard Soccer and of the world, we want to take this experience as an opportunity to encourage our fellow women to band together in combatting this type of behavior, because we are a team and we are stronger when we are united.

To the men of Harvard soccer and to the men of the world, we invite you to join us, because ultimately we are all members of the same team. We are human beings and we should be treated with dignity. We want your help in combatting this. We need your help in preventing this. We cannot change the past, but we are asking you to help us now and in the future.

We are hopeful that the release of this report will lead to productive conversation and action on Harvard’s campus, within collegiate athletic teams across the country, and into the locker room that is our world. But ultimately, we hope this will catalyze the cultivation of an environment and a culture that strives to lift up all of its members.

Finally, to the men of Harvard Soccer and any future men who may lay claim to our bodies and choose to objectify us as sexual objects, in the words of one of us, we say together: “I can offer you my forgiveness, which is—and forever will be—the only part of me that you can ever claim as yours.”

Brooke Dickens ’16, Kelsey Clayman ’16, Alika Keene ’16, Emily Mosbacher ’16, Lauren Varela ’16, and Haley Washburn ’16 are the six members of the Harvard Women’s Soccer recruiting class of 2012.

 

For GENDERS Students Only

Dear GENDERS students,

Please be informed that the “triad” format for the 3rd Journal Entry is optional.  You can do the assignment by yourself or with a pair.  Either way, the deadline for the assignment is still on November 9, 2016.

Be guided accordingly.  Thank you.